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20130801
20130831
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, in washington, d.c., in st. louis, in kansas city, in detroit, in flint, michigan, and other areas around this -- fast food workers. they were people who work in burger king, mcdonald's, popeye, they are the ones who give you the hamburgers and the french fries. what they are saying is workers all over this country, they cannot make it on $7.25 an hour, $7.50 an hour. often they are unable to get 40 hours of work and in most cases they get no or very limited benefits. all over the country, these workers, often young people, are walking out of their establishments, their fast-food places and are educating the consumers about the economic injustice taking place in these fast-food establishments. what they are saying is we need to raise the minimum wage in this country, that american workers cannot exist on $7.25 an hour which is the national minimum wage now or $8 an hour or $9 an hour. my own view is that the very least we should be raising the minimum wage to $10 an hour. just do the arithmetic. if somebody is making $7.25 an hour and if they are lucky enough to be getting 40 hours a week
government must step in to ensure the state and local government. the problem detroit faced is that -- >> state, local, and tribal government. >> and tribal government. [laughter] >> okay. >> the problem with detroit, unlike many municipalities that depend on revenue from real estate tax, they run on income taxes. they never recovered from 2001. the black unemployment rate never recovered from 2001. that downturn decimated the revenue stream for the city, and it never came back. if there are banks that are too big to fail, and we have to step in to make sure they function, there are cities that are too big to fail. [applause] >> bankruptcy in one of those cities. >> yes, and so it is not enough for the administration to say, oh, we're behind you, droit. no. we said to wall street, $800 billion we're behind you, so that's being behind me. [laughter] >> okay. behind you, what are the policies? >> so, wall street caused more damage than what we have put into the budget. there needs to be a financial transaction tax because when they gamble, we lose. [applause] they have to pay
of when they think of boston politics. >> what other races are you keeping an eye on? >> one is detroit. field ofthis candidates narrowed in a runoff to just two contenders for a job which is very important right now. the election itself may be less important compared to what happens after the election. how much power the mayor will even have when there is an emergency manager with sweeping authority. there is also houston. a democratic mayor is running a republicanerm opponent. she was elected mayor of houston, it became the largest american city with an openly gay mayor. you wouldy necessarily stereotype houston, texas. texas, it is worth keeping an eye on what happens there. if you cover politics and policy in this era of budget -- >> you cover politics and policy. what can mayor is expected from washington regarding infant -- regarding infrastructure, the nuts and bolts. >> you talk to mirrors over the country -- you talk to mi ayors and they are fed up with how little support they get from washington. certainty.ally no stimulusof ways, the that a lot of folks credit with helping gi
as we have seen in europe and detroit last week? >> you frame this very well. i think it's a important as said to put things in context. when i go back to those years, it was an extraordinary time in american fiscal history. i will never forget being called to an emergency meeting in the fall of 2008 to the majority leader's office. they had been chairing the meeting on energy in another part of the capitol complex. i walked in and there may be 16 or 17 people in the room and in the house and the senate, republicans and democrats. the psychiatry of the treasury and the bush administration was about 6 o'clock in the evening they posted a guard at the door and closed the door. it was very unusual, as you know. and i knew something dramatic was afoot. i sat down and the meeting began. the secretary of the treasury and the federal reserve told us they were taking over the large insurance company the next day and they made very clear they were out there to seek our advice or approval. they were there to inform us they were taking the steps and they told us that if they did not do it they be
million of our residents are on food stamps today. one in three households in detroit, according to the associated press, four out of five u.s. adults struggle with joblessness, near porveghts or reliance on welfare. there's no shortage of labor in the united states. there is a shortage of jobs in the united states. our goal must be to help our struggling americans move from dependency to independence, to help them find steady jobs and rising pay, not declining pay. our policy cannot be to simply relegate more and more of our citizens to dependence on the government while importing a steady stream of foreign workers to take the available jobs. that is not in the interest of our country or the people of this country. some contend our unemployed don't have the needed skills. well, let's train them. we now spend over $750 billion a year on means-tested welfare assistance-type programs. that's the largest item in the budget, bigger than social security, bigger than defense, bigger than medicare. and of that amount, we spend about -- for every $100 we spend on those programs, we only
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5